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(Fixed some of the awful grammar, removed irrelevant information, added some example sprites)
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[[Image:Ethan encounters a Shiny Charizard.PNG|thumb|250px|Ethan encounters a Shiny [[Charizard]].]]
 
[[Image:Ethan encounters a Shiny Charizard.PNG|thumb|250px|Ethan encounters a Shiny [[Charizard]].]]
{{Nihongo|'''Shiny Pokémon'''|ポケモンの光る|Pokémon no Hikaru}} are [[Pokémon]] with a very different type of color than the original colored Pokémon. Shiny Pokémon has been introduced since [[Generation II]] in [[Pokémon Gold and Silver|Pokémon Gold Version and Pokémon Silver Version]] which the first shiny Pokémon that was introduced was a [[Gyarados|Red Gyarados]]. Shiny Pokémon have been considered to be one of the rarest Pokémon due to their rare appearance. The term "shiny" is a reference to their difference in color than the original also to their sparkling animation and sound effect when the battle starts. The term was unofficial prior to [[Generation V]], when the [[Pokédex]] began cataloging shiny Pokémon and using the term itself.
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{{Nihongo|'''Shiny Pokémon'''|ポケモンの光る|Pokémon no Hikaru}} are [[Pokémon]] with different coloration than the normal versions of the Pokémon. Shiny Pokémon have been included since [[Generation II]] in [[Pokémon Gold and Silver|Pokémon Gold Version and Pokémon Silver Version]] in which the first shiny Pokémon that was introduced was a [[Gyarados|Red Gyarados]]. Shiny Pokémon are considered very rare. The term "shiny" is a reference to their difference in color and their sparkling animation and sound effect when they enter into battle. The term was unofficial prior to [[Generation V]], when the [[Pokédex]] began cataloging shiny Pokémon and using the term itself.
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== Comparison ==
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The differences between some Pokemon and their shiny counterparts are very obvious, such as Charizard, whose shiny version is completely black.
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{| border="0" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" class="article-table" style="width: 250px; height: 50px; margin: 0px auto; "
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|[[File:006bw.png|thumb|Normal Charizard sprite]]
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|[[File:006-1.png|thumb|Shiny Charizard sprite]]
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|}
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Other shiny Pokemon are very similar to their normal versions, such as Clefable.
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{| border="0" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" class="article-table" style="margin: 0px auto; height: 50px; width: 250px; "
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|[[File:036bw.png|thumb|Normal Clefable sprite]]
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|[[File:036-1bw.png|thumb|left|Shiny Clefable sprite]]
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|}
   
 
== Encountering ==
 
== Encountering ==
In Generation II, when a battle starts the game picks four random numbers between 0 and 65535. If any of the numbers is less than eight then the encounter will be a shiny Pokémon. The chance of seeing a shiny Pokémon is 1 in every 8192, or 0.0122%. From [[Generation III]] onwards, shiny Pokémon are determined by other factors such as the Trainer ID number and the personality value of the Pokémon. They can sometimes become shiny when you got the right amount of '''Soft Resets''', also known as '''SR''' through a shortcut. This can be time consuming because of the amount of the time spent constantly SR'ing. Achieving a shiny this way can take days or even weeks.
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In Generation II, when a battle starts, the game picks four random numbers between 0 and 65535. If any of the numbers is less than eight then the encounter will be a shiny Pokémon. The chance of seeing a shiny Pokémon is 1 in every 8192, or 0.0122%. From [[Generation III]] onwards, shiny Pokémon are determined by other factors such as the Trainer ID number and the personality value of the Pokémon. They can sometimes become shiny when you perform the correct amount of '''Soft Resets''' (also known as '''SR'''s) through a shortcut. This can be a time consuming process, taking days or even weeks.
   
 
==Methods==
 
==Methods==
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*If the bush has a whitish shake, it might be a non-native [[Pokémon]].
 
*If the bush has a whitish shake, it might be a non-native [[Pokémon]].
 
*Never use it in water, caves or tall grass.
 
*Never use it in water, caves or tall grass.
*The bush with the same type of shake as the first [[Pokémon]] you battled that is the farthest away within a four by four grid most likely is the same [[Pokémon]].
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*The bush with the same type of shake as the first [[Pokémon]] you battled that is the farthest away within a four by four grid is most likely the same [[Pokémon]].
*The likelihood of finding a Shiny Pokemon increases the higher your chain continues unbroken. After finding 40 of the same Pokemon in a row, the odds are at their highest. Sparkling grass indicates a Shiny Pokemon is in that bush.
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*The likelihood of finding a shiny Pokemon increases as your chain continues unbroken, but is at a maximum when the chain reaches 40. Pulsing, sparkling grass indicates a Shiny Pokemon is in that bush.
   
 
===Masuda Method (Gen IV-V)===
 
===Masuda Method (Gen IV-V)===
This method is when you breed two Pokemon, one from your game, and one from another language's game (Japanese, English, French, etc.). At first the chances of finding a shiny are 1/8192, if you use this method in gen IV the chances are cut, to 1/2048, whereas in gen V they are cut even more to 1/1365.3. So the chances of hatching a shiny are extremely easier. Although this seems to be high, and it is much higher than the normal method, but using the Masuda Method still mathematically averages one shiny egg per every 947 eggs. So if you got a shiny egg before the 947th egg you hatched, you should count yourself lucky. This method was created and announced by Junichi Masuda, director of GameFreak to add fun stuff to the game after you beat it. Such as shiny hunting, using the GTS, and more!
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To use this method you must breed two Pokemon from two different language games. If you use this method in generation IV the chances of hatching a shiny Pokemon are raised from 1/8192 to 1/2048, whereas in generation V they are even better at 1/1365.3. Although this is much higher than normal, using the Masuda Method still mathematically averages one shiny egg for every 947 eggs. This method was created and announced by Junichi Masuda, director of GameFreak.
   
 
Tips
 
Tips
*I suggest going on to the Global Trade Station (GTS) and get a Japanese Ditto.
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*Use the Global Trade Station (GTS) to find a Japanese Ditto
*Then select a pokemon and put it in the Day-Care with the Japanese Ditto.
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*Select a pokemon and put it in the Day-Care with the Japanese Ditto
*Keep hatching until you find a shiny.
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*Keep hatching until you find a shiny
   
 
===Soft Reset (Useful for Legendaries and Shiny Starters (Gen. II to Gen. V))===
 
===Soft Reset (Useful for Legendaries and Shiny Starters (Gen. II to Gen. V))===
   
One method which is easy enough (but often very time consuming) works for starters and most [[Legendary Pokémon]]. Basically, the method is to stand in front of the legendary Pokémon you will catch/starter you will take and save. If you don't get a shiny when you get your starter/battle the legendary, soft reset the game by pressing A+B+Start+Select on the GBA and L+R+Start+Select on the DS. This method can easily require over 1000 resets before you get a shiny, however with enough dedication and patience your efforts can pay off.
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One method which is easy enough (but often very time consuming) works for starters and most [[Legendary Pokémon]]. Basically, the method is to stand in front of the legendary Pokémon you will catch/starter you will take and save. If you don't get a shiny when you get your starter/battle the legendary, soft reset the game by pressing A+B+Start+Select on the GBA and L+R+Start+Select on the DS. This method can often require over 1000 resets before you get a shiny, however with enough dedication and patience your efforts will pay off.
   
 
==In-Game Shiny Pokémon==
 
==In-Game Shiny Pokémon==

Revision as of 20:24, September 27, 2013

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